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Veuves

Town, village, neighbourhood in Veuves
  • Veuves is a very old village with a rich historical past, situated on the banks of the Loire in the alluvial plain of the major river bed. Vestiges of the Roman era have been discovered here: stone walls, fragments of pottery, statuettes, etc. In Merovingian times, gold and silver coins were minted here, bearing the inscription In Merovingian times, gold and silver coins were minted here, bearing the inscription "Vidua Vico Fit", made in the village of Veuves, examples of which are kept in...
    Veuves is a very old village with a rich historical past, situated on the banks of the Loire in the alluvial plain of the major river bed. Vestiges of the Roman era have been discovered here: stone walls, fragments of pottery, statuettes, etc. In Merovingian times, gold and silver coins were minted here, bearing the inscription In Merovingian times, gold and silver coins were minted here, bearing the inscription "Vidua Vico Fit", made in the village of Veuves, examples of which are kept in the Cabinet des Médailles in Paris.
    In the 11th century, a monastery was founded here by Clovis, then destroyed by Norman pirates. Popular legend has it that the name Veuves dates back to the Viking invasion, when all the men were killed, leaving only widows, hence the Latin name VIDUA. The most convincing theory is that Veuves derives its name from its geographical location on the banks of the Loire, with the Celtic root "VI-DUV" meaning "deep river". In the 19th century, the village was home to an important post office.

    As soon as you enter the village on the RD 952, you are greeted by the church of St Vincent. Built in the 12th century and remodeled in the 15th, it boasts a bell dating from 1742, which was listed as a historic monument in 1943. The stained glass windows and frescoes on canvas, a true stamp of devotion and antiquity, are by FOURNIER, a master glassmaker in Tours, and were installed between 1884 and 1889. They recount the discovery in 962 of the relics of St Bénigne and Ste Agnès, buried during the passage of the barbarians. The village features a timber-framed house dating from 1560.