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Chambon-sur-Cisse

Town, village, neighbourhood in Chambon-sur-Cisse
  • Chambon-sur-Cisse, municipality of Valencisse.

    The village, which bore the name "Campus Bonus" in the 13th century, adopted the name Chambon-sur-Cisse in 1270. The origin of the name "Chambon" is the Gallic word "cambo", meaning "curve", the curve formed by the left bank of the Cisse. Chambon was the oldest possession of Marmoutier Abbey, one of the largest Benedictine monastic centers in the Carolingian Medieval West. Chambon has been under its jurisdiction since 832, the time of...
    Chambon-sur-Cisse, municipality of Valencisse.

    The village, which bore the name "Campus Bonus" in the 13th century, adopted the name Chambon-sur-Cisse in 1270. The origin of the name "Chambon" is the Gallic word "cambo", meaning "curve", the curve formed by the left bank of the Cisse. Chambon was the oldest possession of Marmoutier Abbey, one of the largest Benedictine monastic centers in the Carolingian Medieval West. Chambon has been under its jurisdiction since 832, the time of Charlemagne and Louis le Pieux.

    Today, Chambon's agricultural and wine-growing past has made it a commune of preserved architecture and natural heritage, and a favorite destination for hikers and cyclists.

    Saint Julien church
    In the center of the village stands the 12th-century church of Saint Julien, remodeled in the 16th century. The bell tower is built on a square base. Note the arrangement of the apse roofs. The church contains two emblems of the 18th-century brotherhood of Saint Vincent and Saint Sébastien.

    Maison La Dejimberie
    (Private property, not open to visitors, but visible from the road)
    A handsome 19th-century residence, its roof surrounded by a decorative wooden lintel.

    Château de la Poterie
    (Private property, not open to the public but visible from the road)
    Beautiful 19th-century mansion.

    Bury Gate
    The first feudal castle was built at Bury in the late 11th century to defend Blois against attacks by the Counts of Anjou. Bury was the scene of numerous battles. Few traces of the castle remain, but in the 12th century, it was a walled town, with the Porte de Gravière in particular. In the 1st half of the 14th century, Bury was the country residence of the Counts of Blois. The Renaissance was at its height in the 16th century. Florimond Robertet, royal secretary and minister to kings Charles VIII, Louis XII and François 1er, bought the estate and built the first Renaissance-style château inspired by Italian art. An ornamental park with formal gardens completed the work. Unfortunately, only a few vestiges of this exceptional château remain.

    Fontaine de Gravière: The current state of the Fontaine de Gravière, better known as the Fontaine de Bury, dates from 1860. It is a very powerful spring.

    Lavoir communal du pont Fouleret: A pretty, traditional washhouse on the banks of the Cisse.

    Charles-Paul RENOUARD, a renowned painter and artist, regularly stayed at the café-restaurant-hôtel de la Gare. The artist is buried in the Chambon cemetery. Other local celebrities include Victor-Auguste POULAIN, the famous Blésois chocolatier, who crushed his first cocoa beansves de cacao at the Chambon mill, and Hippolyte de VILLEMESSANT, former editor of Le Figaro, who lived at his lovely Château St Louis estate.