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Saint-Gervais-la-Forêt

Town, village, neighbourhood in Saint-Gervais-la-Forêt
  • Bordering on the south of Blois, Saint-Gervais is at the crossroads of the four main Sologne roads.
    roads. Since 1770, three of these have met at the "Patte d'Oie" crossroads (Lamotte-Beuvron, Romorantin-Lanthenay and Contres). The fourth runs along the Cosson and reaches the village from the north.

    Saint-Gervais is crossed by a river, the Cosson, and has seen the disappearance over the centuries of the Poissonnière river, whose bed is still present in the present-day village.
    The village...
    Bordering on the south of Blois, Saint-Gervais is at the crossroads of the four main Sologne roads.
    roads. Since 1770, three of these have met at the "Patte d'Oie" crossroads (Lamotte-Beuvron, Romorantin-Lanthenay and Contres). The fourth runs along the Cosson and reaches the village from the north.

    Saint-Gervais is crossed by a river, the Cosson, and has seen the disappearance over the centuries of the Poissonnière river, whose bed is still present in the present-day village.
    The village is surrounded to the south and west by the Russy forest, which occupies most of the commune (494 ha of the village's total surface area of 897 ha), hence the toponym.

    The neighboring communes are Blois to the north, Vineuil to the east, Mont-près-Chambord and Cellettes to the south and
    Chailles to the west.

    The commune's altitude ranges from 67 meters in the north (Cosson valley) to 110 meters in the south.

    Known as Saint-Gervais-des-Près for over a thousand years (between the 8th century and the
    Revolution), then Saint-Gervais-sur-Cosson, the village took its present name on August 11, 1918, to distinguish it from the 17 other communes of the same name.

    A village of winegrowers and meadows, renowned since the 17th century for its cream, between 1794 and 1795 it took the name Bonne-Crème and that of Gervais-sur-Cosson.

    The village was under the rule of the Lords of Aubépin between 1034 and 1789.

    The first lords of l'Aubépin were called de Bapaulme, the most famous being Gabriel-Charles de Lattaignant, who inherited the seigneury in 1724 and sold it in 1734 to the last lord of l'Aubépin, Adam-François-Melchior Mahy Du Plessis.

    From December 20, 1803 to March 20, 1828, Saint-Gervais was attached to the town of Blois.

    Electrification of the village began in 1910.

    During the Second World War, Saint-Gervais was the site of a German army base from
    June 18, 1940 to September 1, 1944. The commune was heavily bombed between June 15 and 17
    1940. A camp for African and Malagasy prisoners was set up in the Perrières (stone quarries) in 1940.

    In 1952, the drinking water network was installed.